Green Cars – Clean Green Nappy http://cleangreennappy.co.uk/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 02:25:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1.png Green Cars – Clean Green Nappy http://cleangreennappy.co.uk/ 32 32 Red-Hot Mike Salinas on Top https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/red-hot-mike-salinas-on-top/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 00:03:44 +0000 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/red-hot-mike-salinas-on-top/ Mike Salinas won Top Fuel’s No. 1 qualifier on Saturday at the NHRA Thunder Valley Nationals, closing in on his third straight victory at Bristol Dragway. Robert Hight (Funny Car), Aaron Stanfield (Pro Stock) and Angelle Sampey (Pro Stock Motorcycle) also qualified No. 1 in the ninth of 22 races in the 2022 NHRA Camping […]]]>

Mike Salinas won Top Fuel’s No. 1 qualifier on Saturday at the NHRA Thunder Valley Nationals, closing in on his third straight victory at Bristol Dragway.

Robert Hight (Funny Car), Aaron Stanfield (Pro Stock) and Angelle Sampey (Pro Stock Motorcycle) also qualified No. 1 in the ninth of 22 races in the 2022 NHRA Camping World Drag Racing Series season.

Salinas took first place in his 11,000 horsepower Valley Services/Scrappers Racing dragster in the final qualifying session, clocking 3.767 seconds at 327.59 mph to earn his second No. 1 position this year and 10th of his career. Seeking his fourth win this year, Salinas has won the last two races at Bristol and also qualified for the last three final rounds at the track. He’s felt right at home in Thunder Valley for the past few years and will open the eliminations on Sunday against Cameron Ferre.

“I’ve won Father’s Day here before (in 2019) and it would be very special to do it again,” Salinas said. “This place has a special place in my heart. I don’t know why he likes me so much, but it’s just beautiful here. (But) I think tomorrow you’ll be surprised how fast these cars go. I think they’re going to be in the low 3.70s. The good thing is that we showed that we can win from any place. There is no ego in this team and it was really cool to see this year.

Steve Torrence, who was the No. 1 provisional qualifier on Friday, was second after his 3.791 at 317.79 and Josh Hart is third with a 3.791 at 316.60. Points leader Brittany Force qualified in fifth place.

Robert Hight is Funny Car’s top seed for Sunday’s eliminations in Bristol.

NHRA/National Dragster

Hight stayed ahead in Funny Car thanks to his 3.971 to 310.98 on Friday in his 11,000-hp Chevrolet Camaro SS Auto Club, giving him his 73rd career No. It’s also his second No. 1 qualifier of 2022, as he continues to battle Matt Hagan for the points lead. Both riders have three wins and Hight will be looking for a fourth this year on Sunday. He admitted the team still had work to do on race day to get the car running smoothly in Bristol.

“I certainly didn’t think this race (starting Friday) was going to be the best,” Hight said. “We went there last time trying to run better but it put a cylinder out early. To be in the position that we’re in is really good because heading into race day I still don’t think we have a good grasp of this thing based on our last race. I have a good feeling if we’re able to do four three-second runs tomorrow we’ll hold the trophy at the end of the day, and that’s the goal. It was an impressive crowd today. Seeing a full house is just awesome.

Tim Wilkerson moved up to second in the final session, passing 3.996 at 317.05, while Hight’s teammate John Force made the only other three-second run with his pass of 3.997 at 321.96. Hagan is one spot behind in fourth.

After finishing second at Epping and racing at Bristol Dragway for the first time in his Pro Stock career, Stanfield jumped into first place on Saturday in his Janac Brothers Chevrolet Camaro with an impressive run of 6.638 to 206.57. It gives the standout youngster his third No.1 qualifier this season and fourth of his career. He’s been No. 1 three times in the last five races, but Stanfield, who opens the eliminations against Wally Stroupe, is after his first win since February. Stanfield, who is second in points, will look to become the third active rider in the class to win at Thunder Valley along with reigning world champion Greg Anderson and Erica Enders.

“The crew chiefs did their job and they did a great job,” Stanfield said. “All the car guys gave me the best car they could give me and it’s up to me to do my job tomorrow. It’s definitely really cool to qualify #1 here on such a great track. We haven’t had the best chance of the No. 1 spot in my career yet, so we’ll see if we can turn things around tomorrow.

Rookie Camrie Caruso qualified second with his run of 6.644 at 204.23, also posting the fastest run of the final session, while points leader Enders, who is aiming for his fourth consecutive victory, is third with a 6.658 at 205.63.

Seeking his second straight win at Bristol – and his first win this season – Sampey was nearly untouchable this weekend at Thunder Valley, qualifying No. 1 on his Vance & Hines/Mission Foods Suzuki with a 6.874 assist at 196.04. Sampey improved on her Friday time which initially put her in first place, also giving the world three-timer her 55th No. 1 qualification, and she will open the day of racing against LE Tonglet. Bristol have been very good for Sampey so far and getting a first win of 2022 on Sunday would ensure that continues.

“I changed my routine a bit and I want to keep training,” Sampey said. “(Team manager) Andrew (Hines) and I have been working on that, Eddie (Krawiec) is also helping. Andrew did a great job. This Suzuki Vance & Hines is on a roll. The bike is a beauty. I’m a little disappointed with my reaction time that lap, I don’t know what I did wrong, but we have tomorrow. I never thought I would qualify as No. 1. I never thought I would win the race last year so who knows what will happen. I just hope I end up on the bright side.

Joey Gladstone made an impressive move in the final qualifying session, moving up to second with a 6.889 run at 194.44. Points leader Steve Johnson, on his third win of 2022, qualified third with a 6.894 at 195.39.

NHRA Thunder Valley Nationals

Qualifying results, Sunday elimination pairings

Top fuel — 1. Mike Salinas, 3.767 seconds, 327.59 mph against 16. Cameron Ferre, 4.438, 189.34; 2. Steve Torrence, 3.791, 317.79 vs. 15. Lex Joon, 4.253, 212.19; 3. Josh Hart, 3.791, 316.60 vs. 14. Justin Ashley, 3.975, 252.95; 4. Antron Brown, 3.802, 323.35 vs. 13. Tony Schumacher, 3.913, 306.33; 5. Force de Bretagne, 3.807, 325.69 against 12. Doug Kalitta, 3.877, 321.12; 6. Clay Millican, 3.808, 321.73 vs. 11. Doug Foley, 3.870, 316.75; 7. Austin Prock, 3.835, 325.30 vs. 10. Leah Pruett, 3.867, 318.32; 8. Spencer Massey, 3.861, 319.60 v 9. Shawn Langdon, 3.861, 319.07.

funny car — 1. Robert Hight, Chevy Camaro, 3.971, 310.98 vs. Bye; 2. Tim Wilkerson, Ford Mustang, 3.996, 317.05 to 15. Jack Wyatt, Dodge Charger, 6.519, 106.21; 3. John Force, Camaro, 3.997, 321.96 vs. 14. Terry Haddock, Mustang, 5.498, 132.54; 4. Matt Hagan, Charger, 4.014, 318.09 vs. 13. Phil Burkart, Chevy Monte Carlo, 4.857, 173.67; 5. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 4.035, 316.90 vs. 12. Alexis DeJoria, Toyota Supra, 4.461, 214.08; 6. Cruz Pedregon, Charger, 4.068, 312.71 vs. 11. JR Todd, Supra, 4.390, 222.51; 7. Jim Campbell, Charger, 4.080, 306.19 vs. 10. Chad Green, Mustang, 4.212, 259.16; 8. Paul Lee, Charger, 4.084, 310.77 vs. 9. Ron Capps, Supra, 4.087, 311.70.

Professional stock — 1. Aaron Stanfield, Chevy Camaro, 6.638, 206.57 vs. 16. Wally Stroupe, Camaro, 6.735, 203.52; 2. Camrie Caruso, Camaro, 6.644, 204.23 vs. 15. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.717, 204.29; 3. Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.658, 205.63 vs. 14. Cristian Cuadra, Ford Mustang, 6.703, 205.10; 4. Kyle Koretsky, Camaro, 6.662, 204.60 vs. 13. Mason McGaha, Camaro, 6.692, 204.70; 5. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 6.663, 204.88 vs. 12. Kenny Delco, Camaro, 6.691, 204.91; 6. Matt Hartford, Camaro, 6.664, 205.54 vs. 11. Deric Kramer, Camaro, 6.688, 205.60; 7. Dallas Glenn, Camaro, 6.675, 204.76 vs. 10. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.685, 206.54; 8. Troy Coughlin Jr., Camaro, 6.682, 205.85 vs. 9. Fernando Cuadra Jr., Mustang, 6.683, 204.98. Did not qualify: 17. Alan Prusiensky, 6.739, 203.16; 18. Fernando Cuadra, 6.788, 203.03; 19. Shane Tucker, 6.901, 203.77; 20. Larry Morgan, 7.826, 151.09.

Pro Stock Motorcycle — 1. Angelle Sampey, Suzuki, 6.874, 196.04 vs. 16. LE Tonglet, Suzuki, 7.228, 185.36; 2. Joey Gladstone, Suzuki, 6.889, 194.44 vs. 15. Jianna Evaristo, Suzuki, 7.222, 182.65; 3. Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 6.894, 195.39 vs. 14. Ron Tornow, Victory, 7.097, 189.23; 4. Marc Ingwersen, EBR, 6.921, 194.35 vs. 13. Karen Stoffer, Suzuki, 7.067, 191.40; 5. Matt Smith, Suzuki, 6.927, 195.62 vs. 12. Chris Bostick, Suzuki, 7.016, 190.89; 6. Angie Smith, EBR, 6.932, 196.82 vs. 11. Malcolm Phillips Jr., Suzuki, 6.980, 192.66; 7. Jerry Savoie, Suzuki, 6.943, 194.18 vs. 10. Eddie Krawiec, Suzuki, 6.965, 195.00; 8. Jim Underdahl, Suzuki, 6.947, 194.35 vs. 9. Ryan Oehler, EBR, 6.956, 195.19. Did not qualify: 17. Wesley Wells, 7.426, 180.84.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and uploaded to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content on piano.io

]]>
Electric car happiness will turn to fury when real range becomes clear https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/electric-car-happiness-will-turn-to-fury-when-real-range-becomes-clear/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 16:04:12 +0000 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/electric-car-happiness-will-turn-to-fury-when-real-range-becomes-clear/ Vintage illustration of an “electronic car of tomorrow” driving on a city highway, with electronics … [+] Display and guidance, 1950s. Screen print. (Illustration by GraphicaArtis/Getty Images) Getty Images A brand new electric car shines in your driveway and your first reaction will be excitement, followed perhaps by a hint of smugness. Be sure to […]]]>

A brand new electric car shines in your driveway and your first reaction will be excitement, followed perhaps by a hint of smugness.

Be sure to take advantage of this moment as the next will be furious after plugging it into your home and the range achieved after a full charge has no relation to the number suggested by the dealer, or the one listed in the specification details of the car.

Manufacturers are reluctant to provide accurate information and organizations such as the Association of European Automobile Manufacturers would not answer my questions. Meanwhile BEUC, the European Consumer Organisation, is not happy and wants action. Electric vehicle makers hope that by the time sales reach the same level as internal combustion engines (ICEs), the technology could advance to a point where battery-electric cars can compete head-on, but it seems unlikely let it happen so soon.

If you bought a 32.6kWh Mini e and are charging the battery, the shortfall could be as high as 32% – 98.5 miles versus 145 miles, according to my data. For a Vauxhall/Opel Corsa E 50kWh, that’s nearly 25% (154.5 miles vs. 209 miles). Buyers of the Polestar 2 78 kWh will be relatively happy. The possible range is only about 7% less than the 270 promised 292 miles. That won’t last though because when you embark on your first long-distance highway/freeway trip, you’ll be shocked to find that you don’t you’ll only get around 40 per cent of the range on offer, which is if you’re cruising at normal speeds with the air conditioning on, the infotainment system doing its job and the heater stalling you; just like drivers of ICE-powered cars enjoy it carefree.

The “normal” cruising speed in Britain is around 75 mph. The actual legal limit is 70 mph, but the accepted speed that most drivers believe will avoid pursuit is around 80 mph. In mainland Europe, the actual speed limit on motorways is 82 mph, so 90 mph should be possible. At these higher speeds, the impact on range is even more devastating. In Germany, there are still sections of autobahn with unlimited speed.

When the new buyer’s fury of misinformation has died down, the next reaction will be to find the culprits, and that won’t help the mood. Manufacturers all hide behind the same excuse. Range claims are based on so-called WLTP (Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Procedure) data, a scientific attempt to ensure that all claims offered are based on the same methodology. That’s true, but because it’s based on computers rather than actual real-world experience, the claims are all overstated, but fully comparable.

To add to the confusion, there is also a procession of surveys from management consultants heralding the imminent triumph of electric cars with barely a few negatives mentioned. Earlier this month, an EY survey found that 49% of UK drivers ‘want’ an electric car to replace their ICE vehicle, up from 21% two years ago, which would be a ‘tipping point’ in the market British. Almost 75% of Italians were “looking for” the same thing, according to a survey of 18,000 people in 18 countries, according to the EY Mobility Consumer Index. Would any sane EV investor care much about a likely purchase by people who said they would “seek” or “want” to buy power?

But EY said this.

“These results truly mark a tipping point in the UK car buying market. Almost 50% of consumers in the UK (and even more in Italy) indicating they want an electric vehicle is a milestone in the transition from ICE to electric vehicles. The speed of this change has also been telling, with a 28% increase in just two years in potential buyers who would opt for an electric vehicle over an ICE vehicle,” according to Maria Bengtsson from EY.

To be fair, EY admits that sales could be somewhat inhibited by the huge upfront cost of an EV, the lack of a charging network and range anxiety.

Meanwhile, Boston Consulting (BCG) says pure battery cars will be the “most popular” in the world by 2028, three years earlier than its 2021 forecast.

The EVBox Mobility report says more than half of Britons – 52% – “are more likely” to buy electricity compared to the rest of Europe, not least because they see it as a contribution to stopping the climate change.

The problem with all these warm feelings is that they have no connection to the real world. The undeniably strong start to electric car sales has been driven by well-heeled early adopters who aren’t too worried that their electric vehicle won’t quite do what it says on the box.

To possess it is to worship it.

But while politicians are demanding a rapid demise of new ICE vehicles – the EU is proposing 2035, Britain has mandated 2030 – it means mass market EV sales are crucial and here every penny counts.

The value-seeking electric car buyer will demand that if the manufacturer says the battery, fully charged, will deliver, say, 300 miles, it will deliver 300 miles. No finagling and bamboozling with concepts like WLTP will be acceptable. Only real world data should be used. Manufacturers must be clear about the extension of the expressway on the motorway. On most electric vehicles, this reduction varies between 30 and 50%. It must be conceded. The impact of cold weather on range can mean up to 30% reduction in range. Likewise, the impact of full loads of people and luggage is a reality, and one must recognize the need to regularly top up to only 80% capacity to preserve battery life. There are reports that the tire wear could be excessive due to the enormous weight of the batteries, but this is currently only conjecture and needs to be confirmed.

Organizations like the Association of European Automobile Manufacturers (ACEA) do not want to comment on this. ACEA, (its acronym in French), did not respond to emails or phone calls. So is the voice of the UK motor industry, the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders. Two motorist organizations, the AA and the RAC, also remained silent. Brussels-based green lobby group Transport & Environment declined to comment.

BEUC, the European Consumer Organisation, has spoken out on the matter, however, calling for more details to be made available to electric vehicle buyers, such as actual electric range, charging speed and charging time. average load. Brussels-based BEUC is not very fond of the WLTP system, although it admits it is better than the system it replaced.

“(WLTP) remains a laboratory test which cannot reflect all driving and usage conditions. Also, more than for diesel and petrol cars, the actual range will be very different depending on the driving conditions: a car Battery-powered electric vehicles will drive much longer in the city than on the motorway, so it is crucial to correctly inform consumers about the real range of their vehicles, in different conditions,” BEUC said in a report.

In an email response, BEUC Sustainable Transport Manager Robin Loos said this –

“BEUC is asking consumers for clearer information on the actual mileage they can get from their electric cars. At the moment, going to the dealership gives a general WLTP value whose test cycle is not clear to consumers. This WLTP value also cannot be broken down for each of the different driving situations that consumers face – like city driving, high speed, highways only,” Loos said.

“We call on the EU to legislate to provide more real data to consumers and to display this information at dealerships. For example, it is now possible to exploit the electricity consumption data of cars in circulation, because they are equipped with an on-board fuel or electricity consumption meter. The specific thing to address is the 20-year-old EU car labeling legislation which needs to be updated,” Loos said. .

]]>
What incentives for electric car buyers are offered in Australia? https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/what-incentives-for-electric-car-buyers-are-offered-in-australia/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 06:08:00 +0000 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/what-incentives-for-electric-car-buyers-are-offered-in-australia/ Until very recently in Australia, and unlike almost all other OECD countries, there was no level of government incentivizing the purchase of electric vehicles. Of course, the federal government has a higher threshold for green cars before applying the luxury car tax, but that applies to any car with a fuel efficiency of less than […]]]>

Until very recently in Australia, and unlike almost all other OECD countries, there was no level of government incentivizing the purchase of electric vehicles.

Of course, the federal government has a higher threshold for green cars before applying the luxury car tax, but that applies to any car with a fuel efficiency of less than 7.0 liters per 100 km and can’t really be called an incentive for electric vehicles (EVs).

However, in recent years, Australian state governments have announced measures to encourage the transition to electric vehicle ownership. Those lucky enough to live in the “good” state can save thousands of dollars.

Below is an overview of each state’s consumer-focused initiatives and the impact on the price of Australia’s most popular electric car.

How much does Australia’s most popular electric car cost in each state?

What does all this mean for the bottom line?

Below are the “drive-thru” figures (including discounts) for the most popular variant of the Model 3 sedan in its lowest-priced trim configuration. Prices include Tesla’s recent price increase in mid-March.

The biggest variable behind the differences between states (after any refunds) is the amount of stamp duty. Stamp duty is non-existent or negligible in the cheapest states, and Western Australia’s prices reflect its status as a stamp duty heavyweight with buyers hitting over $4,000 in duty.

Australian Capital Territory: $62,255

New South Wales: $63,694

Northern Territory: $68,345 if purchased before July 2022, $66,649 after July 1, 2022

South Australia: $65,883

Tasmania: $66,201

Victoria: $66,361

Queensland: $67,664

Western Australia: $70,876

The above figures are by car and include all relevant stamp duty discounts and reductions. Some discounts may need to be claimed after purchase

Western Australia

The Western Australian state government recently announced an electric vehicle (EV) assistance program that includes $3,500 rebates for buyers spending less than $70,000. Headlining WA’s announcement is the ‘Clean Energy Car Fund’, which will include $36.5 million in taxpayer dollars to pay up to 10,000 rebates of $3,500 each, to Australians westerners who purchase a new electric or hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCEV) up to a value of $70,000. WA in 2021 announced a 45-station charging network worth $21 million stretching from Kununurra in the north to Perth and to the regional hubs of Esperance and Kalgoorlie.

Australian Capital Territory

Until the NSW policy was announced in 2021, the ACT claimed to have the most generous incentives of all. New electric vehicles are exempt from stamp duty, which equates to around $2,700 for a $60,000 car that emits more than 221g of CO2 per km. All electric cars, new or used, purchased from the ACT are also exempt from registration fees for two years. ACT also has a Sustainable Household Program that will provide interest-free loans of between $2,000 and $15,000 to eligible households to help with the initial costs of investing in energy-efficient upgrades, including zero-emission vehicles.

New South Wales

In terms of dollars, NSW is now certainly ahead of the incentives. Like the ACT, new and used electric vehicles (less than $78,000) are exempt from stamp duty. In addition, the first 25,000 electric vehicles sold for less than $68,750 benefit from a $3,000 rebate on the purchase price. Along with these incentives, more than $170 million will be spent on charging infrastructure in New South Wales.

queensland

Queensland has joined several other states in releasing a policy aimed at increasing the adoption of electric vehicles. From July 2022 and for three years, buyers of electric vehicles in Queensland will be eligible for a $3,000 subsidy for any new electric vehicle priced below $58,000. This $45 million program will be complemented by an additional $10 million to be spent on charging infrastructure. This is in addition to the lower registration costs and stamp duties previously instituted for electric vehicles, as well as the earlier construction of the “electric vehicle highway” designed to provide high-speed charging stations favorably spaced along the entire length of the east coast of the state.

Victoria

New electric and hydrogen vehicles (under $68,740) attract a $3,000 grant. There are over 20,000 grants to be awarded under the current scheme, with the first batch being 4,000. Victoria also has an electric car infrastructure package worth $19 million. Although there is no stamp duty exemption, Victoria applies a flat stamp duty for electric cars, regardless of the purchase price. Electric vehicle owners pay $8.40 per $200 market value, the same as internal combustion cars under $69,152. Conventionally powered luxury vehicles pay up to $18 per $200 market value if they exceed $150,000. You might say that’s an incentive, but only if you’re lucky enough to choose between a Porsche Taycan and a Panamera. Finally, all Victoria-registered EVs will also receive a $100 rebate upon their annual registration. Unlike every other state, Victoria has already started charging electric vehicle drivers a road user charge of 2.5 cents per km (2.0 cents for plug-in hybrids) while such a charge in NSW and SA won’t start until 2027. can expect to part with $250 if they drive 10,000km a year.

southern australia

South Australia is offering a $3,000 rebate on the first 7,000 new battery electric vehicles under $68,750 including GST. Demonstrators and used cars are not eligible for the program. New battery electric cars under the same price of $68,750 incl. GST also entitles you to three years of free registration fees, although other insurance-related fees may apply.

Tasmania

New and used electric vehicles are exempt from stamp duty, which will reduce the on-road price of a $60,000 vehicle by approximately $2,400. There is also two years of free registration for electric vehicles used for rental purposes, covering both private ride-sharing operators and rental companies. Tasmania is also spending $600,000 to expand its public DC fast-charging network.

North territory

The Government of the Northern Territories has announced measures in 2021, which are expected to come into effect in mid-2022, to promote the uptake of electric vehicles. There are no rebates, but electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles with more than 50km of range get a $1,500 reduction in stamp duty through mid-2027. The state is also offering free registration through mid-2027. There will also be investment in charging facilities, although it is not yet clear what form this will take.

]]>
This Chevy feels a lot better than a Tesla right now https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/this-chevy-feels-a-lot-better-than-a-tesla-right-now/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 02:08:39 +0000 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/this-chevy-feels-a-lot-better-than-a-tesla-right-now/ Placeholder while loading article actions Drive along American highways and all you see are sport utility vehicles and gas-powered pickup trucks. Sedans are rare and electric ones even more so. It is even then that the prices at the pump increase. The problem is that internal combustion engine vehicles are becoming more user-friendly and cleaner […]]]>
Placeholder while loading article actions

Drive along American highways and all you see are sport utility vehicles and gas-powered pickup trucks. Sedans are rare and electric ones even more so. It is even then that the prices at the pump increase.

The problem is that internal combustion engine vehicles are becoming more user-friendly and cleaner than they were in the past. Electrical appliances don’t come close, and there just aren’t enough of them.

The advantages of owning an electric vehicle are many, without a doubt. If you’re already lucky enough to have one, you could save $1,800 to $2,600 in operating and maintenance costs this year, assuming an average of 15,000 miles of driving. You can feel good about just refilling, instead of watching gas bills go up. And, of course, you can celebrate that you’ve joined the ranks of consumers who are more aware of climate change.

I recently traveled through the northeastern states of the United States in a Chevrolet Traverse and a Honda Pilot. So I’m not surprised that many would rather drive these cars than compete for an electric vehicle. The technical features – often taken for granted by owners of superbly designed German cars with a strong steering feel – make navigating suburban highways extremely easy. Thoughtful features and innovations include a blind spot sensor on the side mirrors to help change lanes, easy gear shifting, an extra row of seats that don’t make the car feel too big and a well-integrated interface like Apple CarPlay or Android Auto. They’re now basic in new cars and I’d say cooler and more useful than Tesla Inc’s dance and celebrate mode.

Walk into a showroom today and you can walk away with a gasoline engine car too. An electric will probably take a lot longer. Add to that the fixed annual fees being considered, or already in place, in US states and the value proposition of owning an EV begins to fade. Of the 12 states that have proposed new or increased EV fees, 10 will charge drivers more than a gas-powered vehicle by 2025. In total, the cost of ownership is high and exceeds the price of the car.

Ultimately, people want a comfortable and easy riding experience. Of all the electric vehicle owners, few engage in battery logistics or emissions on a daily basis. The sad reality is that with inflation eating away at wallets, consumers aren’t so focused on being green or reducing their carbon footprint. And they can already feel like they’re doing their part to help save the planet by using less plastic or composting. Such is the human psyche.

It is also important to remember that traditional cars have also become better and more fuel efficient. Carbon dioxide emissions have fallen 24% over the past two decades, while fuel economy has increased by more than 30%, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency. Meanwhile, all types of vehicles are producing record levels of emissions. There is no doubt, however, that once you start driving electric vehicles or even hybrids, the emissions go down further. But these are bonuses at this point.

The reality is that the hurdles for electric vehicles are increasing and most importantly is the growing list of consumer concerns.

Lowering these obstacles is not that difficult. This requires political guidance and the introduction of clear steps to address concerns. Range anxiety? Run fast chargers and upgrade networks. Many companies are participating, including FreeWire Technologies Inc., which recently signed a letter of intent with a pit stop operator, Phillips 66. Costs? Expand government incentives and credits for owners while discouraging internal combustion engine cars.

The United States is working to incentivize companies to expand things like electric vehicle charging networks and has just begun to innovate in battery and green car production facilities. But it’s slow and doesn’t directly address consumer concerns or cost of ownership. China, on the other hand, has encouraged buyers and manufacturers of electric vehicles and built the necessary infrastructure.

Making electric vehicles more accessible is not the challenge for the United States; political belief is.

More from Bloomberg Opinion:

• The United States is losing the race for electric vehicle batteries: Anjani Trivedi

• Do you want a family sedan? You’re not driving: Conor Sen

• US needs Elon Musk to sell electric cars: Matthew Yglesias

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board or of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Anjani Trivedi is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies in Asia. Previously, she was a reporter for the Wall Street Journal.

More stories like this are available at bloomberg.com/opinion

]]>
June in Vermont marked by birch, oak pollen, poplar down https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/june-in-vermont-marked-by-birch-oak-pollen-poplar-down/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 08:51:11 +0000 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/june-in-vermont-marked-by-birch-oak-pollen-poplar-down/ There’s an abundance of green flakes covering sidewalks and cars right now, and it seems hard to avoid the white fluffy tufts in the air lately. There is a film of green over the waters along the shores of Lake Champlain and if the wind blows be prepared to encounter fluff clouds. So what’s going […]]]>
]]>
Electrifying domestic flights could be the first big step towards reducing carbon emissions from aviation https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/electrifying-domestic-flights-could-be-the-first-big-step-towards-reducing-carbon-emissions-from-aviation/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 09:53:56 +0000 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/electrifying-domestic-flights-could-be-the-first-big-step-towards-reducing-carbon-emissions-from-aviation/ The aviation industry releases more than 900 million tons of CO2 every year, or around 3% of all man-made carbon emissions. Its impact on the planet is only expected to grow as the number of passengers increases. There is no “magic bullet” to solve the problem of aviation emissions, but one of the avenues explored […]]]>

The aviation industry releases more than 900 million tons of CO2 every year, or around 3% of all man-made carbon emissions. Its impact on the planet is only expected to grow as the number of passengers increases.

There is no “magic bullet” to solve the problem of aviation emissions, but one of the avenues explored to reduce greenhouse gases is the development of electric planes.

Electrifying your trip to the other side of the planet may still be a long way off, but in recent years, significant progress has been made on short-haul journeys. Almost half of all commercial flights would be less than 800 km, which means that there is great potential for reducing CO2 emissions on these short routes.

Some aircraft already in development are capable of around 90 minutes of flight time on a single charge. And those numbers will only get better as the technology for these zero-emission vehicles improves.

Where do airlines start with electrification?

Some countries are already clinging to these advancements and investing in technology to make electric flights possible. Norway is one such nation, having pledged in 2018 to make all short-haul flights leaving its airports electric by 2040.

The country’s unique landscape with its high mountains and deep fjords means that many people depend on flights to get around between cities. Around 60% of trips made by its 54 million passengers are domestic, and the situation is similar in most Scandinavian countries.

Sweden and Denmark have also announced their intention to make all domestic flights fossil fuel free by 2030. Solutions to achieve these goals include hybrid aircraft, hydrogen engines using fuel generated from renewable energy – and electric plane.

But a network of short take-off and landing airports makes Norway an ideal candidate for zero-emission flights and here electricity is at the center of its technological advances.

Widerøe, the largest regional airline operating in the Nordics, plans to launch its first electric passenger plane as early as 2026. It has partnered with the aircraft manufacturer Rolls Royce and electric aircraft maker EVE to make it happen.

Rolls-Royce recalls that Norway has “unique characteristics which make it the ideal starting point”. It is also a leader in electric transport with more electric cars per person than any other country in Europe and the world’s first electric car and passenger ferry.

But, to make the transition to zero-emission transport possible, more countries and airlines need to commit. So where else in Europe is there an ideal candidate for electrification?

The ideal place for electric flights

The UK appears to be an obvious choice for the electrification of short-haul flights. Traveling from London Heathrow to Aberdeen is the longest internal journey at 1 hour and 15 minutes, which fits well with the restrictions of the aircraft already in development.

Even some international flights from the UK have the potential to go electric in the near future with Amsterdam and Paris around an hour from the country’s biggest airport.

A study commissioned by electronics distributor Distrelec analyzed 100 flights departing from UK airports. Based on 2019 data, he estimates that a total of 2.7 million tonnes of CO2 could be saved if the country’s domestic flights went electric.

France is another European country where short-haul flights are currently under the environmental microscope. In April, domestic journeys of less than 1.5 hours where passengers can take the train or bus instead are now prohibited.

But according to Distelec, there are also 36 popular national roads that could easily be electrified in the near future. They include flights from Paris Charles de Gaulle airport to Rennes, Nantes, Lyon, Bordeaux and Marseille.

As the ability to fly these short distances increases, European countries have more and more opportunities to electrify their domestic flights – but only if they choose to invest in the technology to do so.

What if we electrified long-haul flights?

While the goals are currently firmly set on the electrification of shorter journeys, as the technology develops it is possible that it could also cover longer journeys.

According to Juliana Kiraly of Eve Urban Air Mobility, a maker of electric vertical take-off and landing planes, anything learned from these small vehicles will “help in the development of bigger planes.”

If countries and their national airlines choose to invest in technology to green domestic flights, it will only add to the potential for more ambitious projects in the future.

Instead of choosing offset carbon emissionssays David Hild, CEO of the Fly Green Fund, airlines should look to invest that money in green technologies like electric flights.

“When we compensate, we are only paying someone else to improve.”

]]>
[Hidden Wonders of Japan] Beautiful racehorses take a therapeutic bath at JRA’s new facility https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/hidden-wonders-of-japan-beautiful-racehorses-take-a-therapeutic-bath-at-jras-new-facility/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 01:13:02 +0000 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/hidden-wonders-of-japan-beautiful-racehorses-take-a-therapeutic-bath-at-jras-new-facility/ [Hidden Wonders of Japan] Beautiful racehorses take a therapeutic bath at JRA’s new facilityThe Japan Racing Association (JRA) opened its new rehabilitation research center in Iwaki city, Fukushima prefecture on May 26, with five thoroughbreds taking a dip. The facility is specifically designed to rehabilitate injured horses so they can return to the racetrack. Under beautiful blue skies, Meisho Dassai, JRA’s top injured horse of 2020, was led […]]]> [Hidden Wonders of Japan] Beautiful racehorses take a therapeutic bath at JRA’s new facility
Japan Racing Association

The Japan Racing Association (JRA) opened its new rehabilitation research center in Iwaki city, Fukushima prefecture on May 26, with five thoroughbreds taking a dip. The facility is specifically designed to rehabilitate injured horses so they can return to the racetrack.

Under beautiful blue skies, Meisho Dassai, JRA’s top injured horse of 2020, was led around an outdoor doughnut-shaped pool by a trainer. Sniffing and drinking water from time to time, the horse swam 3 or 4 laps in the pool, which has a circumference of 40 meters and a depth of about 3 meters.

342w" sizes="(max-width: 342px) 100vw, 342px" class="lazyload" data-sizes="auto" data-srcset="data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=75&resize=75 75w, data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=100&resize=100 100w, data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=150&resize=150 150w, data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=240&resize=240 240w, data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=320&resize=320 320w, data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=500&resize=500 500w, data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=640&resize=640 640w, data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=800&resize=800 800w, data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=1024&resize=1024 1024w, data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=1280&resize=1280 1280w, data:image/svg xml, 342w?w=1600&resize=1600 1600w" data-src="https://japan-forward.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/20220526-horse-Racing-JRA-Rehabilitation-Reserch-Center-002-683x1024.jpg"/>
Horses take a therapeutic bath as the JRA Rehabilitation and Research Center opens on May 26.

Pool training helps improve cardiopulmonary function without straining the horse’s legs. These drills are performed almost every day during the week until mid-October, and visitors are welcome to watch them for free.

“I feel the power of horses swimming and breathing,” said director and veterinarian Kazumichi Kodaira, enthusiastically promoting the center.

A 42-year-old office worker and horse racing fan from the city of Kashiwa in Chiba Prefecture said with delight, “I didn’t think I could see a horse swimming in front of me!

What is your hidden wonder of Japan? Upload your photo here.

Find more stories about top racehorses and follow horse racing in Japan, here, on our site dedicated to sport, Sports Link.

(Read the article in Japanese on this link.)

Author: The Sankei Shimbun

]]>
A 3-pronged approach to embracing clean energy https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/a-3-pronged-approach-to-embracing-clean-energy/ Mon, 30 May 2022 10:50:00 +0000 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/a-3-pronged-approach-to-embracing-clean-energy/ It has been more than six years since the Paris climate agreement was adopted and 196 countries have agreed to limit global warming and also to work towards a climate neutral world. But the sobering warnings about climate change continued, along with the political deadlock over how to proceed. In a new book, “Confronting Climate […]]]>

It has been more than six years since the Paris climate agreement was adopted and 196 countries have agreed to limit global warming and also to work towards a climate neutral world. But the sobering warnings about climate change continued, along with the political deadlock over how to proceed.

In a new book, “Confronting Climate Gridlock: How Diplomacy, Technology, and Policy can unlock a clean energy future,” Daniel Cohan, a professor at Rice University, argues that a substantial move towards cleaner energy requires a three strands.

“As an atmospheric scientist and environmental engineer, I’m mostly focused on technologies — that’s what we think is most of what we need to be able to clean electricity; what we need for cleaner cars,” he said in an interview with Marketplace’s Andy Uhler.

“But these won’t make it to market and they won’t help cool the climate unless there are policies that force them to deploy them nationally. And what we’re doing domestically isn’t enough because we’re only 1/7 of global emissions so we need diplomacy to take what we’re doing here in the United States and make sure it starts to be applied in other parts of the world as well.”

The following is an edited transcript of the interview.

Andy Uhler: You basically compartmentalize into three different compartments that we need to focus on. Break them down for me. There are three ways out of this impasse of the climate change discussion, aren’t there?

Daniel Cohan: Right. So as an atmospheric scientist and environmental engineer, I focus primarily on technologies – that’s what we think most of what we need to clean electricity, what we we need for cleaner cars. But these won’t make it to market and they won’t help to cool the climate unless there are policies that force them to be deployed at the national level. And what we’re doing domestically isn’t enough because we’re only 1/7th of global emissions so we need diplomacy to take what we’re doing here in the United States and make sure it starts to be applied in other parts of the world as well.

Uhler: Now, when we talk about “clean energy” or “clean energy”, it’s rather trendy. But what does this mean for the average person? How to think about clean energy?

Cohan: Well, none of us want to think too much about electricity – even here in Texas, where we’ve had trouble with the grid. So we want electricity to continue to work for us reliably and affordably, but to start coming from cleaner sources – wind, solar, nuclear or maybe geothermal one day, rather than coal and gas that have dominated the network for decades. And so, what we need is a transition that replaces those dirtier fuels with clean fuels while still doing all the electricity we need, and doing more in the future, as we begin to electrify our cars and further electrify heating and industry.

Uhler: And that’s where a lot of diplomacy and politics come in, I guess, because you have an ingrained industry that’s going to oppose exactly that.

Cohan: Right. There is currently a huge amount of coal and natural gas to be used to generate electricity and the demand for these fuels will decrease as we can switch to cleaner fuels to generate electricity.

Uhler: I’ve thought about it a lot – whether or not there’s a conflicting relationship between things like geoengineering and this type of adaptation that a lot of people are talking about in this space, and mitigation. What do you think? Can the two work together? And it seems that by nature they have to, right?

Cohan: Well, we are going to have to adapt to a warmer climate because even if we do our best, we are still going to live in a warmer climate. And so we’re going to have to adapt to stronger heat waves and stronger droughts and stronger hurricanes, more flooding. But it shouldn’t be seen in opposition, we have to do both – we have to both adapt and we have to mitigate. We need to switch to clean energy; we need to reduce our emissions so that warming doesn’t happen so quickly.

Uhler: Something you and I have talked about before is that the atmosphere, the Earth doesn’t care where the carbon molecules come from. At the same time, you point to the United States as a country that plays, can play, and should play a central role in the fight against climate change. What makes us unique to be able to do this?

Cohan: The United States is absolutely essential in the fight against climate change. Some people point out that we’re not number one in emissions anymore because China passed us, but we’re a pretty big number two. We are historically responsible for more emissions. We emit more per person than almost anyone else. And what makes us really essential is that we are still the largest economy. Thus, the choices we make about the goods we buy; on the rules that we set for international trade — a lot of that dictates what ends up being made in other countries, the rules that other countries adopt. And one thing that I’ve really looked at in watching diplomacy is that there are other countries that have more ambitious climate policies. The European Union has a much more robust carbon emissions market and huge costs it imposes on industries for their emissions, but it generally fails to ensure that these policies extend beyond its borders. While what the United States really does is to be reciprocal; says that if we start taking action, when we do something, we usually insist that our business partners come with us as well. You even hear in Congress talking about whether we ever had a carbon tax, being sure that it was applied in the form of tariffs on goods that were imported. We haven’t done enough on climate policy yet — but if we did, I think we’d be much more likely to bring supporters with us than the Europeans and others have realised.

Uhler: There’s a great little story at the beginning of the book where you talk in college that you were fascinated by this idea. What happened?

Cohan: Yeah, I guess in a way you could see this book as an extension of my seventh grade project for Mrs. Dixon. To age me, I was going to college when James Hansen, the famous NASA scientist, testified before Congress and said that global warming is real and that we are the cause of it. And it had the extra momentum that it exhibited during the hottest summer in Washington, D.C. history in 1988. And I don’t think that would even rank among the twelve hottest summers, we got ourselves warmed up so quickly. But it’s remarkable how much of our understanding of climate change and what’s causing it is really, for the most part, the same as where we were in the 1980s. solve have changed dramatically. Solar has plunged 90% in cost. The wind has plunged 80% in the last 11 or 12 years alone. The solutions towards which we can strive are therefore very different from what they were at the time.

Uhler: Should we focus on existing technology? Should we focus on creating new, cleaner technologies? Is there maybe a middle ground?

Cohan: Things like wind and solar power can already really supplant the dirtiest forms of electricity, and we just need to build them faster; we’re not adding them fast enough. There are other technologies where we really need a big breakthrough. We do not yet have sufficiently affordable heat pumps. We don’t yet have next-generation nuclear technology that’s cheap enough, if at all. Geothermal is really on the verge of becoming something that I think could really take off. What I also see, however, is that what makes these advanced technologies cheaper cannot simply happen in the lab. We need policies that bring them into the market, that get them adopted more – because if we can adopt them then they’re at that point; although they are not cheap enough, this can lead to economies of scale; which can drive what technologists call learning-by-doing. And as you do more and more things, the costs have gone down. And so we have to take that learning-by-doing that made solar energy cheap, and we have to repeat that for geothermal; for clean hydrogen; for so many other technologies as well.

Uhler: Much of this book is about solutions. One thing you often talk about is small-scale actions. And I think that’s exactly what you were talking about; some kind of industry bringing these ideas and innovations to normal people. There are actions people can take that actually make a difference, right?

Cohan: Right. So there’s always this debate between individual action and policy, but policies really work by people adopting these technologies and buying them. And sometimes those early adopters are what it takes to make things affordable. So whether it’s buying electric cars and helping to reduce those costs, or whether it’s companies like Google that decided they were going to start buying geothermal electricity even before it is not as cheap as wind and solar, because they want clean electricity. These trailblazers, whether individuals, businesses, or local governments, can really create a market and help move things to the point where they become more affordable for everyone.

There’s a lot going on in the world. Through it all, Marketplace is there for you.

You rely on Marketplace to break down world events and tell you how it affects you in a factual and accessible way. We count on your financial support to continue to make this possible.

Your donation today fuels the independent journalism you rely on. For just $5/month, you can help maintain Marketplace so we can keep reporting on the things that matter to you.

]]>
2023 BMW iX M60 is a Comfortable and Practical Screamer of an EV https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/2023-bmw-ix-m60-is-a-comfortable-and-practical-screamer-of-an-ev/ Thu, 26 May 2022 15:13:14 +0000 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/2023-bmw-ix-m60-is-a-comfortable-and-practical-screamer-of-an-ev/ The BMW iX M60 is a fully electric sports car that performs just as well on the highway as it does on an alpine pass. Two motors drive four wheels with 610 hp and 811 lb-ft of torque, bringing the 5,769-pound beast to 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds. The five-seater will be released in […]]]>
  • The BMW iX M60 is a fully electric sports car that performs just as well on the highway as it does on an alpine pass.
  • Two motors drive four wheels with 610 hp and 811 lb-ft of torque, bringing the 5,769-pound beast to 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds.
  • The five-seater will be released in June for $106,095.

    If you’re worried that the electric future of all cars, trucks and SUVs is boring, you should have been there on the A9 motorway last week when we were flying at 250 km/h. It’s 155 mph in more colloquial terms. I know 155 is not the fastest you have never been, neither have I, but it’s pretty exciting nonetheless. And 155 mph in a big, spacious SUV full of luggage and three adults is even more thrilling.

    We were ferrying from Berlin to Lago di Como in Italy for the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este and we weren’t going to be late. We also weren’t going to put out any tailpipe emissions because there was no tailpipe. We were flying with the new BMW iX M60, the newest, largest and most powerful $106,095 all-electric SUV — or rather, SAV in BMW parlance — to come from the automaker so far.

    “By integrating a sustainability-focused vehicle concept with modern Sports Activity Vehicle design and exciting dynamic driving characteristics, the BMW iX M60 embodies the best of three worlds; BMW i, BMW X and BMW M GmbH models,” the automaker said.

    The new iX M60 gets iDrive 8.

    BMW

    The i is BMW’s preface to its all-electric vehicles, the X means all-wheel drive, the M means it leans towards motorsport, at least in terms of performance, and the 60 refers, loosely, to horsepower, of which there are 610 when you put it in sport mode. Put it in launch control and total torque will hit 811 lb-ft, or enough to propel you from 0-60 mph in 3.6 seconds, or to Pluto and back from 1 rpm.

    “The extreme power and precise control of electric all-wheel drive, a highly responsive actuator-based traction control system, and suspension technology that includes dual-axle air suspension with automatic level control deliver the driving experience characteristic of BMW M: power, agility and precision”, promises BMW.

    And they don’t lie.

    This is a level 3 DC charging cable, not a gas line.

    Marc Vaughn

    Our guests chose the A9 motorway from Berlin to Leipzig via Munich, at least partly because it has plenty of charging stations. BMW expects an EPA range of 280 miles, but that’s on our EPA cycle run at and below US highway and city street speeds. In Europe they use the much more optimistic WLPT cycle, which returns a range of 349 miles. Of course the range depends on how you drive and like I said we were going 155 mph. Since aerodynamic drag is proportional to the square of airspeed, even with the M60’s very efficient 0.26 drag coefficient, you’re using a lot more power at 155 mph than you would at, say, 55. As a result, we were stopping every 150 miles or so to recharge.

    This was accomplished each time on level 3 DC chargers, which are very good for cramming electrons into batteries. We would typically drive into charging stations with around 20% battery charge on the M60’s 111.5kWh batteries and pull out 45 minutes later at 100%. Thus, any range figure obtained from these hyperspace driving sections would be useless for a driver on any US highway, where driving at 155 mph for long periods of time is generally frowned upon.

    Notice the BMW iDrive 8 screen and the oncoming biker,

    Marc Vaughn

    Once in the Alps, we were able to discover another fun feature of the iX M60: the maneuverability. BMW promises that the M60 offers an “extremely sporty orientation”.

    Generally speaking, BMW’s M cars are among the most perfectly balanced combinations of handling and ride comfort available. Ask anyone who has a BMW M-anything and they’ll tell you how much they love driving it. The M60 gets a double-wishbone front setup and a five-link rear, combined with electric steering with Servotronic assist and variable ratio. Add standard M-tuned adaptive air suspension front and rear with electronically controlled dampers and you get “particularly comfortable handling combined with increased agility and dynamic performance”. The dual-axle air suspension also compensates for heavily loaded rides, as was the case with our three adults and luggage for four, since we were also carrying another guy’s bags. On top of that, you can set the whole thing to whatever drive mode you want to suit your mood and the conditions.

    As we ran out of Autobahn and hit the Alps, our conditions changed from flat, straight speed to a twisty mountain road, heading almost straight for something called Splugen Pass between Switzerland and Italy. Mary Shelley, author of “Frankenstein”, described the pass in her book, Hikes in Germany and Italy:

    “The road was built on the face of the precipice, sometimes dug into the side, sometimes perforated through the living rock in galleries: it passes, at intervals, from one side of the ravine to the other, and bridges of a only arch spanning the chasm… One can imagine how singular and sublime this pass is, in its bare simplicity.

    182 years later, we were perhaps going faster than Mrs. Shelley. His wooden car, as was the engineering of the day, hung on leather straps that you hoped wouldn’t break. Our M60 had continuously adjusted dampers which, according to BMW, take into account “longitudinal and lateral acceleration, road speed and steering angle as well as body and wheel acceleration on the axle front end to deliver the required damping force within milliseconds”.

    Compared to that, Mary Shelley’s carousel was a monster. Additionally, our M60 had rear-wheel steering that reduced the turning radius to just 20 feet—a feature that proved helpful in reducing back and forth through Splugen’s switchbacks. The experience has nothing to do with driving a gas-powered M2, of course; you have to get used to the quietness and immediacy of an EV, but for something over 16 feet long, it felt directly connected to the road, with immediate and precise cornering response. Coupled with 100 percent of the torque available the moment you hit the accelerator pedal, the iX M60 felt more than competent on its way up and down the 6,936-foot-high pass. The more than 20 switchbacks on the Swiss side

    and over 50 switchbacks on the Italian side proved a joy to traverse.

    The 2023 BMW iX M60 is expected in showrooms in June and takes the BMW M standard into uncharted territory. There are M versions of other gas-powered BMW SUVs – excuse me, SAVs – but none are as powerful as this one.

    With one engine in the front and a second in the rear, the M60 offers the safety and grip of all-wheel drive with the power output you expect from an M. If this is the future of M, or at least the future of M’s SAV, then run it.

    Share your thoughts on the BMW iX M60 and other sporty electric vehicles in the comments below.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and uploaded to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content on piano.io

]]>
Colorado does well – but isn’t perfect – on EV chargers https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/colorado-does-well-but-isnt-perfect-on-ev-chargers/ Tue, 24 May 2022 10:08:00 +0000 https://cleangreennappy.co.uk/colorado-does-well-but-isnt-perfect-on-ev-chargers/ Sitting in an electric vehicle with only 25 miles of range left in the battery, far from home in the waiting lot of cell phones at Denver International Airport, half an hour of time to kill and a store of Dunkin’ donuts calling for food… what better place for a fast-charging station, right? Not yet, […]]]>

Sitting in an electric vehicle with only 25 miles of range left in the battery, far from home in the waiting lot of cell phones at Denver International Airport, half an hour of time to kill and a store of Dunkin’ donuts calling for food… what better place for a fast-charging station, right?

Not yet, as frustrated EV drivers have discovered and struggled to comprehend.

But there could be some soon, says the Colorado Energy Office, the agency overseeing construction of the hundreds of thousands of public and private charging stations needed to power the state’s goal of nearly 1 million. electric vehicles on the road within eight years.

There are slower chargers in DIA parking lots. Fast-charging stations built by private companies around DIA, like the neon green juicer Electrify America at East 57th Avenue and Tower Road. And yes, airport and state energy office officials say, the popular cellphone lot, gas station and food court next to DIA is a logical place for a bank. sparkle of fast-charging stations that probably should have happened by now.

Electrify America, with a simple user interface and plugs that can put 50 miles of range in a car in minutes, is “the recipient of a CEO award to build cellphone field stations I’m guessing in the past.” ‘calendar year,’ said Christian Williss, who leads fuels and transportation technology for the Office of Energy.

Analysts say this kind of government-backed growth is helping Colorado keep pace with electric vehicle sales that rank among the top states in the nation. State-funded chargers in high-traffic locations have been a success, they say, with the state’s interstate network regularly adding completed stations.

Now the challenge is to make the charging system fair by installing more daily home chargers in relatively stubborn places like thousands of small apartment complexes, yards where cars are parked all day, and in rural towns with long distances between chargers.

Members of the Colorado Springs Electric Vehicle Club drove en masse for burgers and a quick recharge at George’s Drive-Inn in Walsenburg, Nov. 13, 2021. (Colorado Springs EV Club)

“We need to prioritize charging in multi-family dwellings, as well as charging in the workplace, given the importance of charging in these places,” Williss said.

Drive Clean Colorado, a nonprofit promoting a just transition to clean energy, agrees that while the most visible en-route charging needs that address range anxiety are growing, the real need is the expansion of places where daily commuters will actually recharge: at night at home and at the workplace.

“Keep in mind that most people drive less than 40 miles a day and most cars are parked for hours at a time,” said Bonnie Trowbridge, general manager of Drive Clean Colorado. “So I would like us to focus more on EV charging wherever we see parked cars, whether it’s in your own garage or driveway, the parking lot at the grocery store, or the long-term parking lot at the airport.”

Colorado is doing well to keep pace so far, and is even a bit ahead in the charging game, according to analyst Jesse Toprak of subscription company EV Autonomy. (Autonomy’s subscription works like a lease, but lets people try electric vehicles without a long-term commitment.)

EVs can be plugged into a 120-volt household circuit, or Level 1, charging at around 3 to 5 miles of range per hour. Level 2 chargers can be purchased for the home and are most common in public areas, and can charge between 12 and 80 miles per hour. Level 3 or DC chargers are added at major highway stops and neighborhood gas stations, up to 20 miles of range per minute.

With about 54,000 EVs currently on the road in Colorado, there are 4,150 Level 2 or Level 3 fast-charging ports, Toprak said.

That’s about 90 combined Level 2 and DC fast-charging ports per 1,000 vehicles, better than the U.S. Department of Energy’s recommendation of about 43 ports per 1,000 EVs, Toprak said.

An electric vehicle charging station is available to the public at a municipal building in downtown Salida, Colorado. (Michael Booth, The Colorado Sun, April 2, 2021)

“However, we expect an exponential increase in the number of electric vehicles in Colorado, particularly in Denver, in the months and years to come,” Toprak said. “Therefore, there is a clear need for charging infrastructure to keep up with this increase in demand.”

Colorado has provided $20 million in charging station subsidies over eight years through the state-run Charge Ahead Colorado program, Williss said. About 1,700 stations have been completed statewide, with applications for state assistance open to private businesses, nonprofits, community groups or cities and building owners.

For a Level 2 charging station, Colorado is pooling federal, state and Volkswagen lawsuit settlement funds and may cover up to 80% of the cost, up to $9,000, Williss said. For super-fast DC chargers, the 80% subsidies can be $35,000 or $50,000, depending on speed.

The grants continue to be popular, with three or four applications for each grant slot. That’s why adding millions in federal stimulus money for each state’s electrification efforts will be welcome, he said.

“We are pleased with the additional funding that is coming in,” Williss said. “I think it will help meet some of that demand, although I suspect it will continue to be oversubscribed.”

State and federal authorities are also counting on private efforts to further develop the charging network.

Electric truck and SUV maker Rivian, which now delivers dozens of out-of-stock vehicles to customers in Colorado, is creating a Rivian Adventure Network of fast chargers. Colorado’s first adventure station will open in Salida in June, with Rivian vehicle-exclusive DC fast chargers that can add up to 140 miles of range in 20 minutes, and Level 2 open-grid chargers for vehicles non-Rivian electrics.

Rivian is already opening public charging stations with its brand in every state park. These stations charge all electric vehicles, not just Rivian, and have opened at Cheyenne Mountain State Park in Colorado Springs. Rivian absorbs all facility costs for the state park system.

Eagle County Airport contractors are using state grants for charging stations to meet their goals of greening the airfield, which serves both private jets and public airline sightseeing flights . The Hertz rental business there now has more than 40 electric vehicles in the fleet, Teslas and Polestars. Cooley Mesa Detailing, which cleans and processes returned rentals, has worked with the state to install Level 2 chargers for the electric vehicle fleet that can achieve about 40 miles of range in an hour.

Eventually, Eagle County airport officials want to charge electric vehicles from a solar panel that will cover a parking lot.

State officials say they are trying to direct new rounds of funds for charging stations to disproportionately impacted communities mentioned in both federal infrastructure stimulus spending and the bill on state transportation funding passed in 2021. Although the state’s energy office is awaiting final guidelines on the federal money, at least “40% of the proceeds” are going to impacted communities, Williss said.

“We fully recognize that it’s critical that we make investments in places where we provide access for all drivers, whether they’re in metro Denver, whether they’re in rural areas of cities, whether they’re they are in disproportionately affected communities,” Willis says. “We are looking at how we can modify our programs to ensure that those who do not currently experience them, or who do not necessarily have the same level of play, can still participate.

Autonomy’s Toprak said that while the pace of Charger builds in Colorado seems adequate, everyone involved in the network across the country needs to do more to standardize the plug-in instructions, payment methods and software that communicates with credit card companies and the vehicles themselves. Quirky or unreliable stations and payment methods are “a major headache” for consumers, he said.

It may also require faster communication between government agencies.

Denver Airport officials, who have installed Level 2 chargers in public parking lots, agreed with state officials that a grant for a fast charger in the cellphone parking lot was essential. But, airport officials said Tuesday, that plan is now on hold while the airport considers proposals to redevelop its entire Western approach.

Work on fast chargers for the commercial vehicle parking lot, where taxis and Uber drivers wait, is still progressing, airport spokeswoman Stephanie Figueroa said. “But the mobile phone waiting area project is waiting for conversations.”


We believe vital information needs to be seen by those affected, whether it is a public health crisis, investigative reporting or holding lawmakers accountable. This report depends on the support of readers like you.

]]>